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Discussion Starter · #1 ·



Director: George Clooney
Writers: George Clooney (screenplay), Grant Heslov (screenplay), Beau Willimon (play)
Stars: George Clooney, Ryan Gosling, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Marisa Tomei, Paul Giamatti, Jeffrey Wright, Evan Rachel Wood
Release Date: 7 October 2011 (USA)
Synopsis: An idealistic staffer for a newbie presidential candidate gets a crash course on dirty politics during his stint on the campaign trail. Based on the play by Beau Willimon.


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I'm seeing Gosling litterally EVERYWHERE lately (not that it bothers me)

I'm not into politics in general, but somehow after watching the trailer, it got to me.

That posster is dope btw

Edit: cast is crazy too
 

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This movie will be one of the best of the year when it finally does come out.
I don't usually love any movies based on politics, but this cast is top notch.
Hoffman and Clooney >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Is Ryan Gosling Daffy Duck?

What he's learned from George Clooney, REO Speedwagon, and John Hughes.



For perhaps the first time in his career, Ryan Gosling is showing signs of actually wanting to be a movie star. The potential has been there since 2004, when The Notebook made him an instant heartthrob and the most bankable young male actor on the planet. So instead, he chose to do a smattering of independent films. In addition to starring in the emotionally harrowing Blue Valentine, he has played a guy romancing a sex doll (Lars and the Real Girl), a junior-high teacher with a freebasing habit (Half Nelson, for which he got an Oscar nomination), and a murderous cross-dressing real-estate scion (All Good Things). * This summer's Crazy, Stupid, Love was just the start of his return to more mainstream hunk-appropriate roles. Next, he stars as a stunt-driver turned getaway driver in Drive, from Nicolas Winding Refn (who won the Best Director award at Cannes), followed by The Ides of March, which was adapted from the play Farragut North (written by a former Howard Dean aide) and directed by and co-starring George Clooney. He spoke with Jada Yuan.

Everyone must ask you about Clooney.
Yeah, he's dreamy.

What's he like as a director?
It was amazing, like watching somebody try to explain a song in their head. I can only compare it to seeing Michael Jackson in This Is It, where he's trying to explain to a keyboard player how to play a certain part-even in the sea of parts being played, he can pick that out. That's kind of what George is like. He's like Michael Jackson, basically.

I assume that's a compliment.
I love Mike Jackson. [Clooney] knew exactly what he wanted, and he was very specific. A lot of directors aren't so clear.

Did he play practical jokes?
He'd switch out the hard-boiled eggs at craft service with raw ones. And he liked to come over, give you very serious direction, get you in a very serious place, and then walk away, and you'd realize that he'd been spraying your crotch with an Evian bottle, and then he'd say, "Action." You'd have to act with wet pants.

How'd he switch between the directing and the acting?
He's like Bugs Bunny. He's good at everything, and nothing really fazes him. He's Bugs Bunny, and I'm Daffy Duck.

What about Refn? Why did you push for him to direct Drive?
I'd seen Bronson, Valhalla Rising, and the Pusher trilogy. I felt some kind of a kindred spirit with him, I guess. There was a moment during Valhalla where one character cuts the stomach open of another and pulls out his intestines [laughs], and everybody in the audience was yelling at the screen and hitting each other and turning around. It was fun to be there. I wanted Drive to be the kind of film that you wanted to go to the movie theater to see. I feel like Nicolas makes those kind of movies.

What was his take on the film?
I was driving Nick home from our terrible first meeting. He just basically didn't look at me or talk to me. He sat next to me, so we were shoulder to shoulder, which is, uh, off-putting-and it was awkward silence. REO Speedwagon came on the radio, and he started singing at the top of his lungs and crying and banging on his knees and said, "This is what the movie is. It's about a guy who just drives around listening to pop music because it's the only way he can feel anything." And I had been feeling the same way.

Drive seems somewhat commercial.
I wanted to make Pretty in Pink with a head-smashing.

With a head-smashing?
Yeah. I wanted to make a violent John Hughes movie. Because John Hughes movies are perfect. Or almost perfect. They just need a little violence. You need blood and cotton candy. So that's what we tried to make.

People are already talking about you for an Oscar for Ides. But you had that last year for Blue Valentine and didn't get nominated. What was that like?
A relief.

Does that mean that getting nominated for Half Nelson was not a good experience?
I mean, my mother almost lost her mind. I worry about my family should it ever happen again, because they barely got out with their wits about them.

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
First reviews are in:

Variety - Ho-hum insights into the corruption of American politics are treated like staggering revelations in "The Ides of March." George Clooney's fourth feature as a director observes the inner workings of a Democratic presidential campaign through the eyes of a hotshot press secretary who isn't as smart as he thinks he is; something similar could be said of this intriguing but overly portentous drama, which seems far more taken with its own cynicism than most viewers will be. Still, despite general-audience aversion to topical cinema, a top cast led by Ryan Gosling and Clooney could swing adult viewers in the Oct. 7 release's direction.

The Hollywood Reporter - Had writer/director George Clooney and his co-scripters Grant Heslov and Beau Willimon injected The Ides of March with the intimate political conviction that made Good Night, and Good Luck a critical standout and a frontrunner for liberal patrons, the exit polls would be more positive on this political thriller juggling idealism and corruption with fairly predictable results. Not just its softer narrative and dingy Midwestern setting but its structural lack of heroics is likely to keep the popular vote down on "Ides," which can in any case bank on tense pacing and a superb cast, led by a ruthlessly idealistic Ryan Gosling, to win festival votes beginning with its Venice bow.

Telegraph (4/5) - A smart, confident kick start to what looks like being a notably strong Venice film festival, The Ides of March showcases George Clooney, its director, co/writer and joint lead actor, back in the politically committed mood that spawned Syriana and Good Night, and Good Luck.

The Guardian (3/5) - Perhaps it's true that the public gets the films - and the politicians - it deserves. The Ides of March is tense and involving, a decent choice for the festival's opening-night film. And if that vote seems a little grudging, that's only because I can't help feeling that there were surely wilder, more interesting contenders that fell by the wayside. What remains is your classic compromise candidate: a film that set out with a crusading zeal but had its rough edges planed down en route to the nomination.

Indiewire - So in answer to our earlier question, it's not as accomplished and impassioned as "Good Night and Good Luck," but unlike "Confessions of a Dangerous Mind," it's tonally assured, and unlike "Leatherheads," it's, well, watchable. Very watchable in fact-it moves along at a fair old clip, thanks to Stephen Mirrione's typically taut editing, and another fine, surprising score from Alexandre Desplat. This U.K. based writer is admittedly something of a U.S. politics junkie (we pretty much know "The West Wing" off by heart. All of it. Test us), but we had a blast. Whether wider audiences enjoy it as much remains to be seen (although we're fairly sure that it's early anointment as an Oscar front-runner will disappear quickly), but it at least happily confirms that Clooney the director is here to stay.

Incontention (3/4) t's some trick to pull off acting both knowing and aggrieved, and Clooney's line in irony is too self-congratulatory (and therefore self-defeating) to get there. Taking corruption as a given, we wait for the film to reveal stranger, more perverse details and consequences of the campaign process - not least given the intimate narrative radius of a single Ohio Democratic primary.

What we get instead is an absorbing, occasionally witty liberal suit-opera on "West Wing" lines that nonetheless holds its juiciest sub-plots on a leash. The storyline handed ensemble standout Evan Rachel Wood, lithe, snappy and eventually affecting as a bright young intern whose attraction to Gosling unwittingly jeopardizes all three principals' careers, is initially the most promising of these, holding interesting implications about the longer ladder still reserved for women in politics - until the character is dropped in a datedly dismissive fashion that renders her entire arc a mere device.
It's not the only respect in which Clooney and Heslov's script resembles a highbrow Hollywood screed from the 1940s updated with some token references to the Drudge Report era. (For one thing, the film's view of the media is decidedly quaint: Tomei appears to be the last surviving political journalist in the United States, while the internet is something people use to arrange booty calls.)​
 
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