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Yesterday was ridiculous with the helmet-to-helmet contact.

I've never really been against penalizing players for helmet to helmet and have never been a fan of the term "dirty" hit and I never thought I'd say this but I think I'm siding with Goodell on this one.
 

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august4th said:
^^^^only rule is no hitting at all

players are to fast and big to stop themselves in blink of a eye,,,,,
It's not fair that an offensive player has to be critically injured and out for an extended period of time while the defender gets nothing.

Yes, helmet to helmet is almost always incidental, but that doesn't mean there should be no reprucussions.
 

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august4th said:
so you never seen the hitters leave games do to hits ?

and like I said

no rule or fine will stop the hits.....hits have been in the game for over 50 years.....

and players on both sides of the ball have suffered major injuries from hits
I've seen a lot more offensive players leave than defensive players. The ratio isn't even close to even.

Suspend players a game and see what happens.
 

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http://sports.espn.go.com/nfl/news/story?id=5715892&campaign=rss&source=twitter&ex_cid=Twitter_espn_5715892

Defenders Want Protection, Too
Some NFL defenders are wondering when the league is going to crack down on infractions they see as equally deserving of suspensions as helmet hits, particularly illegal blocks that go on in the trenches.

There's the chop block, when a player blocks a defender low while he's engaged above the waist with another offensive player, and the cut block, where an offensive player dives at the defender's feet and ankles rather than his upper body.

Cut blocks are mainly legal in the open field where the defender can hurdle the offensive player but not at the line of scrimmage, where the tactic is particularly dangerous, sometimes causing career-threatening injuries.

These infractions draw flags and fines when noticed -- but that's not nearly often enough, some defenders complain. And in light of the league's crackdown this week on helmet hits, they're calling for the NFL to protect them, too.

"I think they are headed in the right way of protecting players, but at the same time, where's the protection for the defensive players?" Green Bay Packers linebacker Nick Barnett said.

Some players say the NFL simply doesn't value defense as much as it should.

Just look at all the rule changes over the years that were designed to protect quarterbacks and receivers, suggested Seattle safety Lawyer Milloy: "Our league, every year they come in with new rules and it always seems like there's 15 rules for the offense and then one rule that might get put in for the defense."

"It's an offensive league. That's what it's changing into," Packers nose tackle B.J. Raji said. "You can't hit a guy with your forearms, can't hit with your shoulder pads, you can't do this, you can't do that. I guess the people at the top are offensive guys."
 
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