Kanye to The banner

1 - 20 of 174 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
This is an email I sent to Greg Kot......he's the guy from the Chicago Tribune who totally tore into WTT and called it a "royal waste". He gave it a pretty awful review. So, hopefully the email I sent him will reflect the views of my friends here on KTT. Here is a link to his original review: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-08-08/entertainment/chi-watch-the-throne-review-jayz-and-kanye-west-album-reviewed-20110808_1_roc-nation-jay-z-def-jam-recordings

And here is a copy of the email I sent him in response to the bad review. Let me know what you guys think!

Mr. Kot,

I am writing you in response to your review of Jay-Z and Kanye West's collaborative album "Watch The Throne". Let me begin by stating that I am a fan of all music, as long as it is, of course, good music. When I was a teenager, most of my peers were listening to the popular music of the mid-nineties; groups like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Soundgarden. While I was also a fan of many of those groups, I was obsessed with some of the music you have written books about: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and so much of the other great music that came from the 60's and 70's.

It wasn't until the 2000's that I really started to recognize and appreciate the genius of hip-hop. I was always a good writer in school, and I realized that good hip-hop is a combination of two elements: production and writing. If you examine the lyrics of legendary artists like Jay-Z, you see that his writing skills are comparable to any of the great poets. His use of techniques such as alliteration, puns, and double (sometimes even triple or quadruple) entendres make him as formidable a writer as Emily Dickenson or Robert Frost. Sure, the subject matter may be entirely different, but the way the message is delievered is just as artful.

Which brings me to my main point: I think your review of "Watch The Throne" was completely misguided and just plain wrong. And I will support my point by referring back to those two elements of hip-hop I mentioned above: production and writing.

Kanye West was the main producer on the album. He either produced or co-produced 12 of the 16 songs. There is no producer in hip-hop as well-respected for his art as Mr. West. People can and will say what they want about his ego, his public gaffes, and rude behavior, but there is nobody better at making a good beat than Kanye. That is why he sought after by anyone and everyone looking for a hit single on popular radio. His production on "Watch the Throne" was nothing short of amazing. The thing that made The Beatles the greatest band of all time is the same thing that, in my opinion, makes Kanye the greatest hip-hop producer of all time. He evolves. With each album he makes, his production style morphs into something completely different than what we've heard from him previously. Such is the case when you compare "Watch the Throne" with "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy". The production on both albums is stylistically dissimilar, but nonetheless great in both instances. You mention in your article that Kanye doesn't take as many chances on this album as he has on previous efforts. Maybe you are right…maybe not. But this is not just a Kanye West album. This is a Jay-Z/Kanye West album. Had the beats on this album been released as a Kanye West solo project, I might agree with your analysis of his production. But given that he was producing for himself and Jay-Z, I think he turned in a stellar performance. The music fits the collaboration. It is a perfect mix of the raw, streets-inspired style we expect from Shawn Carter, and the more introspective, "conscious" style we expect from Kanye.

The "punchline" of your review mentions that they urge listeners to "watch the throne," and gaze in awe on their good fortune." Well, yes, they do. But when you wrote that, did you completely forget about the lyrics of "New Day"? Both emcees rap to their unborn sons about much of the bad fortune they both experienced. Kanye reflects on being hated by so many people, stating that "I just want him to be someone people like". Jay-Z recalls a childhood trauma and wishes the opposite upon his unborn son as well: "Cause my dad left me / And I promised never repeat him". Hardly an expression of good fortune. Or what about on "Murder to Excellence" where Mr. West mentions that there are more homicides per year in his hometown of Chicago than there are soldiers killed in Iraq? Sure, there are plenty of lines about living the life that most of us will only dream about, but did you forget that this is a mainstream rap album? EVERY rap album is full of bravado. Even the poor, unsigned aspiring rapper talks about how good he has it compared to the rest of us. That is part of what defines hip-hop. I can think of thousands of albums that do so more than "Watch The Throne".

You mention the economic calamities of the times and seem to feel that it is inappropriate for the artists to mention "private jets and supermodel escapades". Perhaps this album would have served its purpose better if it were released during the Clinton presidency. Of course, I speak in jest. When I hear the lyrics on this album-the "expensive watch" lines-I am not offended. I am inspired. You have to remember that both of these men came from nothing. Today they are the two most influential people in hip-hop. Perhaps to the casual listener, your review might be right on. But to those of us who have enough perspective to realize that good hip-hop is about ALL aspects of culture, and that it's ok-no, glorious-for a person who came from Marcy Projects to brag about how he ended up a CEO, this album is a triumphant reminder that with a little ambition, anyone can "Watch the Throne".

Respectfully yours,
David C. Jordan
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
52,578 Posts
Dave said:
Which brings me to my main point: I think your review of “Watch The Throne” was completely misguided and just plain wrong.
his opinion can't be wrong :cmon: it's his opinion
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,726 Posts
Dave said:
This is an email I sent to Greg Kot......he's the guy from the Chicago Tribune who totally tore into WTT and called it a "royal waste". He gave it a pretty awful review. So, hopefully the email I sent him will reflect the views of my friends here on KTT. Here is a link to his original review: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-08-08/entertainment/chi-watch-the-throne-review-jayz-and-kanye-west-album-reviewed-20110808_1_roc-nation-jay-z-def-jam-recordings

And here is a copy of the email I sent him in response to the bad review. Let me know what you guys think!

Mr. Kot,

I am writing you in response to your review of Jay-Z and Kanye West's collaborative album "Watch The Throne". Let me begin by stating that I am a fan of all music, as long as it is, of course, good music. When I was a teenager, most of my peers were listening to the popular music of the mid-nineties; groups like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Soundgarden. While I was also a fan of many of those groups, I was obsessed with some of the music you have written books about: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and so much of the other great music that came from the 60's and 70's.

It wasn't until the 2000's that I really started to recognize and appreciate the genius of hip-hop. I was always a good writer in school, and I realized that good hip-hop is a combination of two elements: production and writing. If you examine the lyrics of legendary artists like Jay-Z, you see that his writing skills are comparable to any of the great poets. His use of techniques such as alliteration, puns, and double (sometimes even triple or quadruple) entendres make him as formidable a writer as Emily Dickenson or Robert Frost. Sure, the subject matter may be entirely different, but the way the message is delievered is just as artful.

Which brings me to my main point: I think your review of "Watch The Throne" was completely misguided and just plain wrong. And I will support my point by referring back to those two elements of hip-hop I mentioned above: production and writing.

Kanye West was the main producer on the album. He either produced or co-produced 12 of the 16 songs. There is no producer in hip-hop as well-respected for his art as Mr. West. People can and will say what they want about his ego, his public gaffes, and rude behavior, but there is nobody better at making a good beat than Kanye. That is why he sought after by anyone and everyone looking for a hit single on popular radio. His production on "Watch the Throne" was nothing short of amazing. The thing that made The Beatles the greatest band of all time is the same thing that, in my opinion, makes Kanye the greatest hip-hop producer of all time. He evolves. With each album he makes, his production style morphs into something completely different than what we've heard from him previously. Such is the case when you compare "Watch the Throne" with "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy". The production on both albums is stylistically dissimilar, but nonetheless great in both instances. You mention in your article that Kanye doesn't take as many chances on this album as he has on previous efforts. Maybe you are right…maybe not. But this is not just a Kanye West album. This is a Jay-Z/Kanye West album. Had the beats on this album been released as a Kanye West solo project, I might agree with your analysis of his production. But given that he was producing for himself and Jay-Z, I think he turned in a stellar performance. The music fits the collaboration. It is a perfect mix of the raw, streets-inspired style we expect from Shawn Carter, and the more introspective, "conscious" style we expect from Kanye.

The "punchline" of your review mentions that they urge listeners to "watch the throne," and gaze in awe on their good fortune." Well, yes, they do. But when you wrote that, did you completely forget about the lyrics of "New Day"? Both emcees rap to their unborn sons about much of the bad fortune they both experienced. Kanye reflects on being hated by so many people, stating that "I just want him to be someone people like". Jay-Z recalls a childhood trauma and wishes the opposite upon his unborn son as well: "Cause my dad left me / And I promised never repeat him". Hardly an expression of good fortune. Or what about on "Murder to Excellence" where Mr. West mentions that there are more homicides per year in his hometown of Chicago than there are soldiers killed in Iraq? Sure, there are plenty of lines about living the life that most of us will only dream about, but did you forget that this is a mainstream rap album? EVERY rap album is full of bravado. Even the poor, unsigned aspiring rapper talks about how good he has it compared to the rest of us. That is part of what defines hip-hop. I can think of thousands of albums that do so more than "Watch The Throne".

You mention the economic calamities of the times and seem to feel that it is inappropriate for the artists to mention "private jets and supermodel escapades". Perhaps this album would have served its purpose better if it were released during the Clinton presidency. Of course, I speak in jest. When I hear the lyrics on this album-the "expensive watch" lines-I am not offended. I am inspired. You have to remember that both of these men came from nothing. Today they are the two most influential people in hip-hop. Perhaps to the casual listener, your review might be right on. But to those of us who have enough perspective to realize that good hip-hop is about ALL aspects of culture, and that it's ok-no, glorious-for a person who came from Marcy Projects to brag about how he ended up a CEO, this album is a triumphant reminder that with a little ambition, anyone can "Watch the Throne".

Respectfully yours,
David C. Jordan
Well written! Props!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for the kind words.  For those of you who think my review is too long....well, I can't help you.  Sometimes, intelligent conversation takes more than one or two sentences.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
Da Gawd said:
his opinion can't be wrong :cmon: it's his opinion
You're right.  His opinion is an opinion and thus can't be "wrong".  But if you read the review, his interpretations of many of the lyrics on the album are definitely WRONG.  :)
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,273 Posts
Dave said:
This is an email I sent to Greg Kot......he's the guy from the Chicago Tribune who totally tore into WTT and called it a "royal waste". He gave it a pretty awful review. So, hopefully the email I sent him will reflect the views of my friends here on KTT. Here is a link to his original review: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-08-08/entertainment/chi-watch-the-throne-review-jayz-and-kanye-west-album-reviewed-20110808_1_roc-nation-jay-z-def-jam-recordings

And here is a copy of the email I sent him in response to the bad review. Let me know what you guys think!

Mr. Kot,

I am writing you in response to your review of Jay-Z and Kanye West's collaborative album "Watch The Throne". Let me begin by stating that I am a fan of all music, as long as it is, of course, good music. When I was a teenager, most of my peers were listening to the popular music of the mid-nineties; groups like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Soundgarden. While I was also a fan of many of those groups, I was obsessed with some of the music you have written books about: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and so much of the other great music that came from the 60's and 70's.

It wasn't until the 2000's that I really started to recognize and appreciate the genius of hip-hop. I was always a good writer in school, and I realized that good hip-hop is a combination of two elements: production and writing. If you examine the lyrics of legendary artists like Jay-Z, you see that his writing skills are comparable to any of the great poets. His use of techniques such as alliteration, puns, and double (sometimes even triple or quadruple) entendres make him as formidable a writer as Emily Dickenson or Robert Frost. Sure, the subject matter may be entirely different, but the way the message is delievered is just as artful.

Which brings me to my main point: I think your review of "Watch The Throne" was completely misguided and just plain wrong. And I will support my point by referring back to those two elements of hip-hop I mentioned above: production and writing.

Kanye West was the main producer on the album. He either produced or co-produced 12 of the 16 songs. There is no producer in hip-hop as well-respected for his art as Mr. West. People can and will say what they want about his ego, his public gaffes, and rude behavior, but there is nobody better at making a good beat than Kanye. That is why he sought after by anyone and everyone looking for a hit single on popular radio. His production on "Watch the Throne" was nothing short of amazing. The thing that made The Beatles the greatest band of all time is the same thing that, in my opinion, makes Kanye the greatest hip-hop producer of all time. He evolves. With each album he makes, his production style morphs into something completely different than what we've heard from him previously. Such is the case when you compare "Watch the Throne" with "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy". The production on both albums is stylistically dissimilar, but nonetheless great in both instances. You mention in your article that Kanye doesn't take as many chances on this album as he has on previous efforts. Maybe you are right…maybe not. But this is not just a Kanye West album. This is a Jay-Z/Kanye West album. Had the beats on this album been released as a Kanye West solo project, I might agree with your analysis of his production. But given that he was producing for himself and Jay-Z, I think he turned in a stellar performance. The music fits the collaboration. It is a perfect mix of the raw, streets-inspired style we expect from Shawn Carter, and the more introspective, "conscious" style we expect from Kanye.

The "punchline" of your review mentions that they urge listeners to "watch the throne," and gaze in awe on their good fortune." Well, yes, they do. But when you wrote that, did you completely forget about the lyrics of "New Day"? Both emcees rap to their unborn sons about much of the bad fortune they both experienced. Kanye reflects on being hated by so many people, stating that "I just want him to be someone people like". Jay-Z recalls a childhood trauma and wishes the opposite upon his unborn son as well: "Cause my dad left me / And I promised never repeat him". Hardly an expression of good fortune. Or what about on "Murder to Excellence" where Mr. West mentions that there are more homicides per year in his hometown of Chicago than there are soldiers killed in Iraq? Sure, there are plenty of lines about living the life that most of us will only dream about, but did you forget that this is a mainstream rap album? EVERY rap album is full of bravado. Even the poor, unsigned aspiring rapper talks about how good he has it compared to the rest of us. That is part of what defines hip-hop. I can think of thousands of albums that do so more than "Watch The Throne".

You mention the economic calamities of the times and seem to feel that it is inappropriate for the artists to mention "private jets and supermodel escapades". Perhaps this album would have served its purpose better if it were released during the Clinton presidency. Of course, I speak in jest. When I hear the lyrics on this album-the "expensive watch" lines-I am not offended. I am inspired. You have to remember that both of these men came from nothing. Today they are the two most influential people in hip-hop. Perhaps to the casual listener, your review might be right on. But to those of us who have enough perspective to realize that good hip-hop is about ALL aspects of culture, and that it's ok-no, glorious-for a person who came from Marcy Projects to brag about how he ended up a CEO, this album is a triumphant reminder that with a little ambition, anyone can "Watch the Throne".

Respectfully yours,
David C. Jordan
Fantastic writing. :golfclap: You do fiction by any chance? If so, I've got a proposition.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Vomitorium said:
Fantastic writing. :golfclap: You do fiction by any chance? If so, I've got a proposition.
Thank you! I tend to write about things I am very passionate about.  So no, not much fiction.  Sorry.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
18,273 Posts
Dave said:
Thank you! I tend to write about things I am very passionate about.  So no, not much fiction.  Sorry.
Sorry for derailing this thread :ohno:. You do essays? PM me, I'd like to talk about your work. 
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
27,694 Posts
yea man props i consider the reviews of WTT to be muddled because really half of them are horribly biased, seem to be obsessed with minor issues, and completely ignore the great production and very good verses throughout.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,961 Posts
Why would you waste your time writing that shit? It's not like he'll read it and change his mind. He can give two shits what you think.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
631 Posts
Dave said:
This is an email I sent to Greg Kot......he's the guy from the Chicago Tribune who totally tore into WTT and called it a "royal waste". He gave it a pretty awful review. So, hopefully the email I sent him will reflect the views of my friends here on KTT. Here is a link to his original review: http://articles.chicagotribune.com/2011-08-08/entertainment/chi-watch-the-throne-review-jayz-and-kanye-west-album-reviewed-20110808_1_roc-nation-jay-z-def-jam-recordings

And here is a copy of the email I sent him in response to the bad review. Let me know what you guys think!

Mr. Kot,

I am writing you in response to your review of Jay-Z and Kanye West's collaborative album "Watch The Throne". Let me begin by stating that I am a fan of all music, as long as it is, of course, good music. When I was a teenager, most of my peers were listening to the popular music of the mid-nineties; groups like Pearl Jam, Nirvana, and Soundgarden. While I was also a fan of many of those groups, I was obsessed with some of the music you have written books about: The Beatles, The Rolling Stones, and so much of the other great music that came from the 60's and 70's.

It wasn't until the 2000's that I really started to recognize and appreciate the genius of hip-hop. I was always a good writer in school, and I realized that good hip-hop is a combination of two elements: production and writing. If you examine the lyrics of legendary artists like Jay-Z, you see that his writing skills are comparable to any of the great poets. His use of techniques such as alliteration, puns, and double (sometimes even triple or quadruple) entendres make him as formidable a writer as Emily Dickenson or Robert Frost. Sure, the subject matter may be entirely different, but the way the message is delievered is just as artful.

Which brings me to my main point: I think your review of "Watch The Throne" was completely misguided and just plain wrong. And I will support my point by referring back to those two elements of hip-hop I mentioned above: production and writing.

Kanye West was the main producer on the album. He either produced or co-produced 12 of the 16 songs. There is no producer in hip-hop as well-respected for his art as Mr. West. People can and will say what they want about his ego, his public gaffes, and rude behavior, but there is nobody better at making a good beat than Kanye. That is why he sought after by anyone and everyone looking for a hit single on popular radio. His production on "Watch the Throne" was nothing short of amazing. The thing that made The Beatles the greatest band of all time is the same thing that, in my opinion, makes Kanye the greatest hip-hop producer of all time. He evolves. With each album he makes, his production style morphs into something completely different than what we've heard from him previously. Such is the case when you compare "Watch the Throne" with "My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy". The production on both albums is stylistically dissimilar, but nonetheless great in both instances. You mention in your article that Kanye doesn't take as many chances on this album as he has on previous efforts. Maybe you are right…maybe not. But this is not just a Kanye West album. This is a Jay-Z/Kanye West album. Had the beats on this album been released as a Kanye West solo project, I might agree with your analysis of his production. But given that he was producing for himself and Jay-Z, I think he turned in a stellar performance. The music fits the collaboration. It is a perfect mix of the raw, streets-inspired style we expect from Shawn Carter, and the more introspective, "conscious" style we expect from Kanye.

The "punchline" of your review mentions that they urge listeners to "watch the throne," and gaze in awe on their good fortune." Well, yes, they do. But when you wrote that, did you completely forget about the lyrics of "New Day"? Both emcees rap to their unborn sons about much of the bad fortune they both experienced. Kanye reflects on being hated by so many people, stating that "I just want him to be someone people like". Jay-Z recalls a childhood trauma and wishes the opposite upon his unborn son as well: "Cause my dad left me / And I promised never repeat him". Hardly an expression of good fortune. Or what about on "Murder to Excellence" where Mr. West mentions that there are more homicides per year in his hometown of Chicago than there are soldiers killed in Iraq? Sure, there are plenty of lines about living the life that most of us will only dream about, but did you forget that this is a mainstream rap album? EVERY rap album is full of bravado. Even the poor, unsigned aspiring rapper talks about how good he has it compared to the rest of us. That is part of what defines hip-hop. I can think of thousands of albums that do so more than "Watch The Throne".

You mention the economic calamities of the times and seem to feel that it is inappropriate for the artists to mention "private jets and supermodel escapades". Perhaps this album would have served its purpose better if it were released during the Clinton presidency. Of course, I speak in jest. When I hear the lyrics on this album-the "expensive watch" lines-I am not offended. I am inspired. You have to remember that both of these men came from nothing. Today they are the two most influential people in hip-hop. Perhaps to the casual listener, your review might be right on. But to those of us who have enough perspective to realize that good hip-hop is about ALL aspects of culture, and that it's ok-no, glorious-for a person who came from Marcy Projects to brag about how he ended up a CEO, this album is a triumphant reminder that with a little ambition, anyone can "Watch the Throne".

Respectfully yours,
David C. Jordan
What a waist of time with stanning at its finest...let kanye defend himself. No need to get butthurt over a bad review on a album you had nothing to do with. If you like the album cool...that should be sufficent for you. Your time coulda been better used for something else dude. Alotta ppl don't like the album....and alota ppl like it. That's life..an email (that wont be read) ain't gonna change anything.

Just some honest advice. I know youll take it wrong and think im attacking you. But w.e.
 
1 - 20 of 174 Posts
Top