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Creepy/Paranormal Thread Part III

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LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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Just saying hi!


LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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The Lampshade That Drives Its Owner Mad (long read, but creepy and morbid)



Viewed from a distance, it is an unremarkable object. Place it on a corner table in any house, and it would probably pass unnoticed, for a while. Picking it up and holding it is another matter. The translucent quality of the material stretched over its eight panels should be attractive but isn't. The lampshade has a curious, waxy texture. You might convince yourself that the covering was some commonplace form of tanned parchment, were it not for its yellow-green opalescence and the fact that embedded in one or two areas of the material are thin, white filaments, slightly thicker than cotton, that have the appearance of very finely minced squid. It seems somehow surprising that it has no smell.

When you run your finger around the edges of a small square that a DNA analyst cut out of one of the panels, you notice the surprising thinness of the taut covering. Leave anybody to examine this object for long enough and I think they would experience two reactions: a slow but mounting repulsion of the kind that occurs instantaneously when you see a rat, and an impulse to ask: "What is this thing made of?"

Before I handled it, I'd been sceptical of the psychological impact this lampshade is supposed to have had on people. Its last owner was troubled by dreams so grotesque that he felt compelled to get it out of his house. His nightmares continued. The lampshade's current proprietor, the American author Mark Jacobson, won't keep it in his home and says that, even now that it's here, safely in storage, he feels more at ease when he knows the shade is shut away in its white cardboard box. The longer I am left alone with it, standing by a window as the daylight is beginning to fade, the more I can understand why.

"What do you think?" Jacobson asks. "You are aware that the DNA test conclusively states that this lampshade is made out of..."

"I don't think I need to see the DNA test," I tell him.

Witness accounts of such lampshades being discovered at Nazi concentration camps are so common that I'd never questioned the idea that these gruesome ornaments existed. Ilse Koch, wife of the commandant at Buchenwald, was supposedly so partial to such accessories that she was nicknamed "The Lady of the Lampshade". The Holocaust museum at Auschwitz houses two tons of human hair, used by high-ranking Nazis to stuff cushions. The problem for the many who have described seeing lampshades made from people (sources include Allied troops, reporters, intelligence officers and former camp detainees) is that no lampshade fashioned from human skin, of any provenance, has survived as potential support for their testimony. Until now.

Jacobson acquired the lamp four years ago. We have driven for a couple of hours from his home in Brooklyn, across two state lines, to the place where it's kept, safely enclosed in its box, at a location he prefers not to publicise, given the interest, not all of it healthy, that has been generated since his book The Lampshade: A Holocaust Detective Story was published last month.

Jacobson is a highly respected journalist and a contributing editor on New York Magazine. One of his stories formed the basis of Ridley Scott's 2007 film American Gangster, starring Denzel Washington. Jacobson wrote Love Ranch, which stars Helen Mirren as the madame of a licensed bordello. The film opened, to the displeasure of the Daily Mail, earlier this month. Of his novels, Gojiro, whose narrative is observed from the perspective of Godzilla, is rightly considered to be a cult classic. But there's a feeling among his friends that he has never quite found a vehicle which would fully engage his talent as a perceptive, curious and highly intelligent writer; a man well versed in literature and European history with a wonderful ear for dialogue, who is instinctively drawn to subjects that more orthodox writers might dismiss as quirky or even perverse.

In The Lampshade, Jacobson has finally found his niche. It's one of those books – like George Plimpton's seminal Fireworks, or Budd Schulberg's collected writing on boxing – that are powerful and eloquent enough to captivate people with no existing interest in the subject. This last category of reader – The Lampshade being, among other things, about twisted Nazi totemism – is a broad constituency that, until three years ago, included the author himself. Because it was the lampshade, Mark Jacobson recalls, that found him.

"I had a call from my friend Skip Henderson in New Orleans in the summer of 2006," he says. The writer has a second home in the city and, with Henderson, is a member of a group called the Bywater Bone Boys, who maintain a century-old local tradition of rousing Crescent City residents on the morning of Mardi Gras.

"You dress as skeletons, bang on people's windows and shout things like: 'Who next? You next. Rise and shine, predeceased!'" Jacobson explains. "But after Katrina, the joke was over, really. So many people really were dead. It was almost like some force had said: 'You want death? OK. Fine. Have some.'"

Jacobson was at home in Brooklyn when he took Henderson's call. His friend had just bought a marching drum, stained by flood water, from a yard sale.

"He said the guy he'd bought it from, called Dave Dominici, asked him to look at something else. Dominici said: 'I can tell you will really want this thing.' And he took out the lamp. The stand was modern, but Skip immediately noticed the shade, which was old and had a European fitting. He used to sell vintage guitars and he'd talked to me about how German and other European solder is different in colour from what they use here. He knew the solder on this lampshade wasn't American. Skip asked Dominici: 'What's this thing made of?' and he said, 'The skin of a Jew. Collector's item. $35.'"

Skip Henderson, who "likes to wake up with a story", bought the lamp. He took the shade to an expert in hide-tanning, who said: "The animal this came from never had any fur." The object began to prey on his mind to the point that, in Henderson's words, "Since this thing appeared, it's like my face has been shoved into hell."

At the end of their phone conversation, Jacobson recalls, his friend said: 'Anyhow, it's not really my problem any more.' I said 'Oh, really? Why's that?' He said: 'I mailed it to you, last night.'"

Sitting at the kitchen table, back in his welcoming Bohemian house in Brooklyn, Jacobson recalls how, as a Jewish boy growing up in Queens, he was subjected to cries of "Lampshade" by his less liberal gentile classmates. "That's how well known," he says, "the stories from the camps were."

It was here, in this room decorated by the portraits of the Leeds-born artist Jon Langford, that Jacobson first opened the package.

"I took it out," he tells me. "And I remember thinking: 'Ah. This really does look strange.'"

Antique experts confirmed that the shade's frame is European (to this day, American lampshades differ markedly in their design) and 60 to 80 years old. It has tassels in Mardi Gras colours; these, they said, were attached more recently.

Jacobson took it to a friend, Shiya Ribowsky, a forensic investigator who had worked for 15 years in the New York Medical Examiner's Office, an institution that combines a laboratory and morgue.

"They deal with 12,000 bodies every year," Jacobson says, "8,000 of which are autopsied." '

Shiya Ribowsky is also a cantor at a local synagogue. He observed that the material covering the shade bore similarities to more familiar types of parchment, but was "thinner. Much thinner."

Ribowsky, Jacobson points out, "was working at the Medical Examiner's Office in the months and years following 9/11. More than 22,000 separate fragments of what had once been human beings arrived there during that period. Shiya once told me that working there was 'about as close to Auschwitz as I'll ever get: a total onslaught of death'."

This was the same man who, as Jacobson recalls, "held the lampshade to his face, placed it on the table in front of him, then said: 'This is the saddest thing I have ever seen in my life.'"

"So I asked Ribowsky: 'You don't actually think this is real, do you?' He told me: 'There's only one way to find out: DNA.'"

Shiya Ribowsky sent the lampshade to Bode Technology. Bode, based outside Washington DC, is one of the most highly respected DNA laboratories in the world and conducted much of the forensic work following 9/11. The company is regularly called upon by the FBI and has close links with US intelligence services.

Dr Robert Bever, Bode's vice-president and head of research, told Jacobson that there are two kinds of DNA in every cell. "He explained that there's nucleotide DNA, which is the full ledger of a human being's hereditary dossier, and something called mitochondrial DNA."

Nucleotide DNA yields the kind of unique profile that can send someone to death row. It degrades in the presence of light or moisture. The lampshade was, quite obviously, very old. "And," Jacobson observes, "if there was anything New Orleans had in abundance, besides jazz and drive-by shootings, it was sunshine and humidity."

Bever said Bode would attempt, but not guarantee, to identify the mitochondrial DNA, for a fee of $5,000. "The report came back on 20 April 2007," Jacobson says. "It found a 100 per cent probability that the profile was human. Two human profiles were found, one major and one minor."


http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/the-lampshade-that-drives-its-owners-mad-strange-truth-behind-20th-centurys-most-disturbing-object-2117357.html
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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The Cursed Ring Of Rudolph Valentino Very interesting...coincidences??



In the vault of a Los Angeles bank lies a silver ring set with a semiprecious stone. It is not a particularly pretty ring or even a very valuable one, and chances are that no one will ever dare to wear it again. The ring lies in the vault because it bears one of the most malignant curses in the history of the occult. Successive owners have suffered injury, misfortune, even death. And many people still believe it was this ring that sent Rudolph Valentino to a premature grave. Certainly, the violent incidents that have surrounded it over the years can hardly be shrugged off as mere coincidences.

Rudolph Valentino (May 6, 1895 – August 23, 1926) was an Italian actor, sex symbol, and early pop icon. Known as the "Latin Lover", he was one of the most popular stars of the 1920s, and one of the most recognized stars from the silent film era. He is best known for his work in The Sheik and The Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse.

Valentino was born Rodolfo Alfonso Raffaello Piero Filiberto Guglielmi in Castellaneta, Italy, to a French mother, Marie Berthe Gabrielle Barbin (1856 - 1919), and Giovanni Antonio Giuseppe Fidele Guglielmi, a veterinarian who died of malaria, then widespread in Southern Italy, when Valentino was 11. He had an older brother, Alberto (1892-1981), a younger sister, Maria, and an older sister Beatrice who died in infancy.

As a child, Valentino was reportedly spoiled and troublesome. His mother coddled him while his father disapproved of his behavior. He did poorly in school, and was eventually enrolled in agricultural school where he received a degree. After living in Paris in 1912, he soon returned to Italy. Unable to secure employment, he departed for the United States in 1913. He was processed at Ellis Island at age 18 on December 23, 1913.

In 1917, Valentino joined an operetta company that traveled to Utah where it disbanded. He then joined an Al Jolson production of Robinson Crusoe Jr., travelling to Los Angeles. By fall, he was in San Francisco with a bit part in a theatrical production of Nobody Home. While in town, Valentino met actor Norman Kerry, who convinced him to try a career in cinema, still in the silent film era.

By 1919, he had carved out a career in bit parts. It was a bit part as a "cabaret parasite" in the drama The Eyes of Youth that caught the attention of screenwriter June Mathis, who thought he would be perfect for her next movie.

It was in 1920 that Valentino, at the peak of his success, saw the ring in a San Francisco jeweller's. The proprietor warned him that the ring was a jinx, but Valentino still bought it. He wore the ring in his next picture, The Young Rajah. It was the biggest flop of his career and he was off the screen for the next two years. Valentino did not wear the ring again until he used it as a costume prop in The Son of the Sheik. Three weeks after finishing this film, he went to New York on vacation. While wearing the ring, he suffered an acute attack of appendicitis. Two weeks later, he was dead.

Shortly after Rudolph Valentino’s untimely death in August 1926, stories began to circulate that the great Latin lover’s ghost haunted his favorite places. Falcon Lair, the dream home he had built on Bella Drive for his bride Natacha Rambova, became the most commonly reported site for ectoplasmic manifestations of the departed Valentino.

Pola Negri, a famous female movie star of the time, asked to pick a memento from Valentino's possessions, chose the ring-and almost immediately suffered a long period of ill health that threatened to end her career. A year later, while convalescing, she met a performer who was almost Valentino's double, Russ Colombo.

Miss Negri was so struck by the resemblance that she gave him Rudolph's ring, saying, "From one Valentino to another." Within a few days of receiving the gift, Russ Colombo was killed in a freak shooting accident. His cousin passed the ring on to Russ's best friend, Joe Casino. Also at the height of his popularity as an entertainer, Casino took no chances with the ring. Instead of wearing it, he kept it in a glass case in memory of his dead friend. When he was asked to donate it to a museum of Valentino relics, he refused, saying that he treasured it for sentimental reasons. As time passed, Joe Casino forgot the ring's evil reputation and put it on. A week later, still wearing the ring, he was knocked down by a truck and killed.

By now the curse was front-page news. When asked what he proposed to do with the ring, Joe's brother, Del, explained that he could not allow himself to be intimidated by a curse, or jinx, or ghost, or whatever it was. He didn't believe in things like that. Del Casino wore the ring for some time and nothing unusual happened. Then he lent it to a collector of Valentino relics, who suffered no ill effects either. This caused several newspapers to speculate that at last the evil influence of the ring had come to an end. And that seemed to trigger off a new wave of violence.

One night soon afterward, the home of Del Casino was burgled. The police saw the burglar, a man named James Willis, running from the scene. One of them fired a warning shot, but the bullet went low and killed Willis. Among the loot found in his possession was the Valentino ring. It was at this time that Hollywood producer Edward Small decided to make a film based on Valentino's career.

Jack Dunn, a former skating partner to ice star Sonja Henie, bore a great resemblance to Rudolph and was asked to make a film test for the part. He dressed in Valentino's clothes for the test - and also wore the jinxed ring. Only twenty-one years old at the time, Dunn died ten days later from a rare blood disease. After this tragedy the ring was kept out of sight and never worn by anyone again, but that did not seem to curb its fatal influence.

A year after Jack Dunn's death, a daring raid was carried out in broad daylight on a Los Angeles bank in which thieves got away with a haul of over $200,000. In a subsequent police ambush, two of the gang were caught and three passersby seriously injured.

The leader of the bank robbers, Alfred Hahn, was jailed for life. At his trial, Hahn remarked: "If I'd known what was in the vault apart from money, I'd have picked myself another bank." For in the bank's safe deposit vault was the Valentino ring.
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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Ghost Child?



At first glance, it seems to be an ordinary snap of a group of young people. But look more carefully and there appears to be an extraordinary, ghostly presence among them. Peeping out between the knees of two of the girls is the face of a child. The eerie image - clear enough to show a pair of eyes, a nose, a mouth and hair - was captured by 17-year-old Matthew Summers on his mobile phone as he and his friends were preparing to go out.

"I zoomed in to my sister's mate's little sister who was crying and I saw a face," Matthew said. "You can see all the facial expressions and everything. "Usually when you see pictures like that it's a blur but this one is really weird. "I was really shocked because I don't believe in that stuff." Matthew took the picture in his sister's friend's front room in Billingham, Teesside. "I've sent it to my girlfriend and she thinks it's a bit weird," he added.



LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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Was the movie "The Ring" based on real life events?

The story went that there was some kid staying with his grandparents in some remote part of Japan.
He decided to tape a baseball game on late night TV, as his favourite team was playing. But he did not check the channels beforehand, forgetting that they were different there.
Later when he watched the tape, it was just static, but as he watched the static gave way to weird images and then to a strange woman who told him he would be dead in seven days.

Sure enough, upon his return to Tokyo he was found exactly a week later dead of fright.
This story became huge in the summer of 1998 in Japan.
Many schoolkids treated it as completely true and some even claimed to have copies of the tape.
Of course this seemed nothing more than a modern spin on the urban myth.
Nobody treated it seriously until a spate of unexplained deaths among teenagers in several areas of Tokyo.
Friends of some of these teenagers claimed that they had said, just days before their strange deaths, that they had seen the infamous
cursed videotape. About nine teenagers in all died in a period of three weeks,
six of them had claimed beforehand to have seen the videotape.
Three had specifically said they'd viewed the tape exactly a week prior to their deaths.
The cause of death in all nine cases was attributed to cardiac arrest.

The movies "The ring" and "Ringu" were based on this happening.

For those who dare to watch it:


du
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Ghost Child?



At first glance, it seems to be an ordinary snap of a group of young people. But look more carefully and there appears to be an extraordinary, ghostly presence among them. Peeping out between the knees of two of the girls is the face of a child. The eerie image - clear enough to show a pair of eyes, a nose, a mouth and hair - was captured by 17-year-old Matthew Summers on his mobile phone as he and his friends were preparing to go out.

"I zoomed in to my sister's mate's little sister who was crying and I saw a face," Matthew said. "You can see all the facial expressions and everything. "Usually when you see pictures like that it's a blur but this one is really weird. "I was really shocked because I don't believe in that stuff." Matthew took the picture in his sister's friend's front room in Billingham, Teesside. "I've sent it to my girlfriend and she thinks it's a bit weird," he added.





this never happen to me ( im a photographer) even if im taking mobile pics.

but this is crazy(idk if its photoshop or not)
Darktwisted
Yeah
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bump

LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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bump



I'm a get on this asap.  With the album leaking, I haven't been putting much attention to this thread. 
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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I have another cryptic story here to revive the thread.  Read and tell me why it's creepy.

Alone In The House

I was scared after reading the cursed story and because I was alone in the house I switched on all the lights in my room and the hall leading to the bathroom.
But it was all fine in the end.
The only scary thing that happened was when after the bath I went back to my room and switched on the light the bag which had been on the hook fell by itself. That made me jump! lol 
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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Here is another supposed cursed video.  Please note, I have not watched it, so I am not sure if it is creepy, but here is the warning:

"The movie you are about to see may cause you serious spiritual damage.
If you are prone to spiritual damage or you feel reluctant to watch it, please stop the movie immediately.
I will not be responsible for anything that may happen as a result of watching it."


RoyalSavant
Quote

I have another cryptic story here to revive the thread.  Read and tell me why it's creepy.

Alone In The House

I was scared after reading the cursed story and because I was alone in the house I switched on all the lights in my room and the hall leading to the bathroom.
But it was all fine in the end.
The only scary thing that happened was when after the bath I went back to my room and switched on the light the bag which had been on the hook fell by itself. That made me jump! lol 

was it because the light was on before the bath?
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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was it because the light was on before the bath?

Yes...the narrator had turned ON all the lights, so why did she then have to turn on the light in her room after?  Should have already been turned on........
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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The Amherst Poltergeist Story -- Took place here in Canada

PART 1


PART 2
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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Ghost appears on video chat??

Aubrey
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No way in **** am I watching these spiritualy affecting videos or "cursed" videos. I got enough problems of my own. :wom:
LatinoLoco
I am haunted by humans. -Death
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No way in **** am I watching these spiritualy affecting videos or "cursed" videos. I got enough problems of my own. :wom:

Yah...maybe you need to set up a video camera...get some more proof and hopefully peace of mind to see what's going on fam.
Aubrey
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I could try. It's just tough because it's not happening in one place. Idk how I would go about doing it.

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